Sometimes Healthy Living Means Saying No

Good morning!

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Hello from St. Pete! My mom’s birthday flowers are still in full bloom. What a beautiful thing to look at as you eat breakfast, no?

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Today’s breakfast included blueberry-topped protein oatmeal (oatmeal prepared normally with a scoop of chocolate protein powder stirred in at the end) served with a side of mixed nuts.

My mom and I came up with a genius idea to combat my pecan rampage through the big jar of mixed nuts yesterday. Apparently pecans are my mom’s favorite nut as well and she happened to have a bag of unsalted pecans in the freezer that we dumped into the mixed nut jar. Now pecans are flowing freely again and they’re nice and salty, just the way I like ‘em.

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I actually ended up incorporating a few nuts into my bowl of oats for some added texture and crunch.

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And now for a topic I’ve been meaning to address for a while…

Sometimes Healthy Living Means Saying No

I often receive comments and emails from you guys praising me for my healthy attitude and my ability to indulge “whenever I want” without a thought otherwise. This makes me happy in that I feel like living a truly healthy life definitely includes indulgences.

But, on the other hand, I get a weird feeling in the pit of my stomach because I feel like I may be misrepresenting myself and healthy living as a whole.

Don’t get me wrong… I eat foods I love every single day and say yes to dessert if it is offered to me, but I think that sometimes, in the healthy living blogging community, people never want to talk about moments when they said “no” or walked away from indulgent food for fear of people saying that they’re “depriving themselves.”

But the truth is healthy living is saying “no” sometimes.

This morning, as I stared into parents’ pantry, Raisinets and peanut butter M&M’s stared back at me and my body and cravings wanted to eat them for breakfast. Saying no to candy in favor of wholesome oatmeal was a healthier decision and one I was happy I made in the end.

But it’s not something I’d normally blog about.

You better believe I say “yes” when I probably should say “no” quite often. I eat a third slice of birthday cake. I opt for the side of fries instead of fruit sometimes.

But not all the time.

I don’t want to misrepresent myself or healthy living on this blog and just felt the need to clarify that sometimes I do say “no.” If I pass on dessert because I ate half a loaf of bread from the bread basket, that isn’t deprivation. That’s me trying to be a little healthier.

I guess another way to view this thought is that healthy living is saying “yes” on occasion. Not all the time. But sometimes.

Sometimes it’s a good idea to pass on another cookie. Sometimes it’s not. It’s all about daily decisions with the end goal of living a healthy and satisfying life.

I just wanted to make sure you guys don’t think I’m out there saying “Bring it on!” to every indulgent meal that comes my way. That’s simply not true… though some days it is. Hello, cake for dinner!

Question of the Day

  • If you’re an active blog reader or blogger, do you think there’s apprehension to talk about moments when you “said no” in the healthy living blog community?

Comments

  1. says

    I almost feel the opposite way – especially as a dietitan; sometimes I hesitate before posting about my indulgences. I think it all comes back to an overall healthy, balanced, lifestyle… and saying “yes” to more wholesome foods than junk food.

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    • says

      as a dietitian, i can definitely see how people would think you need to be “perfect” all the time. i think you’re right about it all coming back to living a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

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      • Allison says

        Very well stated ladies! I completely agree with everything coming back to balance. It is interesting because as a dietitian, I react completely differently to these pressures. I often find myself saying “yes” to treats (especially in the workplace) because people will give me a hard time (for being too “healthy”) if I always say “no”. I still consider myself fit an healthy but I find myself eating treats when I don’t really even want them… This is something that I have to work on but isn’t it interesting the pressures that are placed on dietitians to eat a certain way?

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        • says

          Interesting post Julie! Haha I’m not a dietician but I get comments from people around me quite often if I’m eating very well and healthily, b/c they want me to “indulge” and be unhealthier in their terms, but it doesn’t bother me.

          On the other hand, when people who know me really well see me eating (grazing) on a bunch of pastries, then they’ll give me a funny look and say something like, “whoaaa you sure do have a sweet tooth! I didn’t know that!” And I know that they don’t mean it in a bad way either! They’re just not used to those things.

          My point is, like you said, balance is important, and yet no one will ever be pleased with what we do 100%. However, I find that lately several people are asking me more and more to help them work out and eat “healthier”! And this is a privilege in my opinion. I’m not an expert, but still learning 🙂

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  2. says

    AWESOME post! In fact, one thing I never discuss is how sometimes (just sometimes) I am glad I am gluten intolerant because that makes it easier to say no to a lot of things when I’m out at a party or something and would say “yes” otherwise. Am I cop’ing out by just “saying” I’m gluten intolerant? Absolutely not. However, I can assure you it makes things easier sometimes!

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    • Heather says

      Please, please don’t take this the wrong way, i dont eant to offend anyone, thisnis simply an observation that has bothered me. a lot of the healthy living bloggers I read are “gluten free”…A TON… And sometimes I wonder if this is often used as an excuse to deprive themselves without coming off disordered. I’ve been through seven horrible years of anorexia/over exercising and I would try to come up with medical reasons as why I couldn’t eat something. So when I read about yet another gluten free blogger, I have to wonder…what percentage is actually gluten free versus looking for a coverup??

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      • says

        No, I definitely understand, and sometimes I wonder this too. In my case, however, it is definitely a medical reason for me not to eat gluten as I have been advised by a doctor to eliminate it after testing! I think some people look at it now as a “diet fad” or a “trend” – I think that there is some gluten that ALL people should avoid (think highly processed white, bleached flours) but gluten ingeneral should not be avoid unless there is medical reasons to back it up!

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        • Heather says

          YES! I totally agree, i try not to eat highly processed foods too but not in a million years would I use the excuse of going gluten free. There are two bloggers that I normally read that recently claimed the whole gluten intolerance bit and I think it’s just like you said, a trend. And then a couple weeks later nothing was ever mentioned again. that annoys me a little, to be honest. I love bloggers like you, chelsea (although i dont have a blog so i hardly comment) and Julie who don’t jump on the bandwagon and stay true to who you are.

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        • Audrey says

          As someone who is currently struggling with anorexia nervosa (hard to type that), I agree about the wave o intolerances that some food bloggers claim to have. Since I am trying with all my might to get better, I always stop and re-evaluate the blog at those times (are the exercises extreme, does the blogger look unhealthy, does it trigger ED thoughts). If it has any of these aspects, I unsubscribe immediately. It’s not just about making sure I stay on the path to reovery, but by me unsubscribing I am making these unhealthy blogs lose readership, which reduces the likelihood that these unhealthy messages will reach more vulnerable people.

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        • Heather says

          Haha, YES, I love Eden!! Having had an eating disorder it’s easy to spot others who are disordered an anytime someone gives up a food group, i grow hugely skeptic. I like these honest blogs where people can say yes to food but also No. I like to think they really ARE healthy!!

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  3. says

    I’m glad you went there on your blog!….I sometimes feel that we get so caught up in being positive that we aren’t simply real all the time…. I totally understand where you are coming from….. However, I always say YES to SPRINKLES! 🙂

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  4. says

    Wow Julie! Thanks for being so honest. I’m not going to lie I didn’t think you really ever did say no that often. I mean obviously I know you have had to say no at some point but it does sometime come across that you don’t. It never mde me love you any less…it kind of made me envious but I feel really good right now knowing that even you say no sometimes. Making the conscious decision to be healthy versus just having it come to you naturally. 🙂 Thanks for sharing and enjoy your day with the family!

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  5. says

    Yes, yes, and yes to this post!!! I’m right there with you that I will happily eat what I enjoy but also know my limits as well. Thanks for putting it into words Julie.

    And THREE WEEKS from today we will have a whole weekend together. Cannot wait!

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  6. Jen says

    Great topic! You are such an inspiration/motivation – I feel like your blog represents all aspects and don’t think you are leaving anything out – it’s awesome to read it! Have a great day!

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  7. says

    Thank you for this! I do think that we tend to write about the times we do indulge because it’s fun and delicious…but I do say no too- if I didn’t, I would not be the size I am and I wouldn’t feel good inside. Love you for your honesty! Check out my first giveaway if you get a chance 🙂

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  8. Lindsey @ Cardio Pizza says

    I do think there is that apprehension because you think you’ll be judged or accused of having an eating disorder. But in reality, it’s important to be honest and let readers know how you really interpret your own healthy living lifestyle.

    Great post! 🙂

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  9. says

    I couldn’t agree more! I sometimes feel a little nervous when I blog about eating Wendy’s once in a blue moon, but I feel more comfortable doing that rather than saying “I really wanted frozen yogurt tonight, but I just said no” because then people assume that your definition of “healthy” is “deprivation”. My biggest motto is “everything in moderation – even moderation.” 🙂 Great post, Julie!

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  10. Katherina @ Zephyr Runs says

    I think its SO easy to misinterpret (mainly if you’re looking for it) someone saying no to mean they’re depriving themselves. It’s difficult to talk about your decisions, defend them, and still come off as a normal healthy person. I think you did it famously 🙂

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  11. says

    I don’t naturally have a sweet tooth (I have a bit of one now that I’m 34 weeks preg, but it’s unusual). I’ve actually found myself ordering dessert before that I don’t really want to prove that I don’t deny myself. How silly is that? I enjoy eating healthy, and when I’m splurging I prefer french fries and nachos, not cake. However, I’ll still order it sometimes to prove… what? I’m not sure, but long story short, yes I’ve felt pressure to prove I don’t deny myself. How silly!

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  12. says

    I think there is a fine line when saying yes or no to certain foods. Alot of my friends do not eat healthy or care too but my family does. Its hard but sometimes saying no makes you feel better in the end 🙂

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  13. lindsay says

    I totally get what you’re saying! I do think it’s alright to be honest, but I kind of presume that you’re turning down stuff because you’re /not/ eating chocolate for lunch every other day, ya know?

    I used to read a blog which talked about saying no but in a very restrictive/disordered way. Not my place to judge her, but since it was triggering for /me/ I had to stop.

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  14. Ally@GirlVFood says

    Sometimes as healthy living bloggers (SPECIFICALLY after the Marie Claire scandal) we can sometimes think that posting about choosing fruit over the cake can be misinterpreted as disordered or guilt eating. For a while I chose the cake every single time, just to prove to myself (and my brain) that I wasn’t sick. But I ended up feeling really gross after a few weeks. My body LIKES fresh foods and whole foods, and while I do say yes to desserts nearly every day, it’s not because I feel like I HAVE to. I just like dessert. I also say no every once and a while, but it’s not because I’m trying to deprive myself.

    Sometimes, the fruit IS dessert. And it pisses me off, so much, when I see other bloggers say ‘fruit is not dessert.’ When you’re maintaining a 70 pound weight loss, or you’re in the middle of losing it, fruit can be the only option you have. Such a great post, Julie! 🙂

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    • lauramich says

      “My body LIKES fresh foods and whole foods…”

      I think this gets at the heart of what “intuitive eating” is supposed to be about. When you’re in tune with how different foods make your body feel, I believe that it’s easier to make better choices without feeling deprived. If I know I’m going to feel gross after eating french fries, then it’s not a difficult decision to order broccoli instead.

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      • says

        I completely agree with this. Like you, Julie, I let myself “indulge” pretty often, but definitely not at every single meal. There’s nothing “healthy” about eating crap all day every day—-but there’s also nothing healthy about depriving yourself of this stuff 100% of the time, either.

        Ever since I started eating healthier (about five years ago), I started to realize how different foods make me feel. I LOVE sweets, and I enjoy them in moderation pretty much daily, but too much sugar literally makes me sick—I get a major headache, and I start to feel nauseous. On the other hand, a piece of fruit has never made me feel sick afterwards. It’s all about listening to your body and giving it what it wants and respecting it enough to say, “Enough is enough.”

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  15. says

    I do think there is some apprehension because of society. With everything being all about bigger, better, more and having everything be as easy access as possible, sometimes people do not understand if you do not eat something you want. There is the thought if you are not eating something you want then how can you presume to say you are happy and emotionally healthy. I get comments like that a lot.
    Then, there is sometimes the opposite. Where people say good job. I’m jealous of your discipline. You never eat anything unhealthy. Which is not true either.
    I think you hit it right on when you said no desert if you eat the bread before dinner. It really is everything in moderation, and a little give and take. We all talk about finding balance and that is all it really is. Balancing the “yes’s” and the “no’s” everyday so that you feel good.

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  16. says

    Great post! You’re so thin and fit it’s hard to believe you indulge at all! Maybe you’re also lucky to have great genes too.

    I would say that it doesnt seem like the blogging community says no, but more when they cave in to a craving. It would be great if we all showed our strength to say no in terms of just being healthier to show that it’s not easy to always walk away from dessert!

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  17. says

    I don’t talk about what I eat often on my blog, but I can say every day for me is about saying no. Or trying to. It’s hard to maintain my weight and I’m not good at it – because I also say yes a lot. So, basically everyday is about me trying to get better at saying no.

    I never really thought of it before, but it’s true…bloggers don’t generally talk about that. At least the ones I read. Maybe it’s because they are too busy talking about what they said yes to.

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  18. Kristin says

    Perfectly said. There is quite the double-standard on those of you with popular healthy-living blogs. You will receive unkind comments for saying “yes” to unhealthy foods, and you will receive (more?) unkind comments for saying no. And what you said is absolutely correct, and I think you are a great example of someone who lives a balanced lifestyle

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  19. says

    Hearing when people have to “say no” to a weakness just motivates me because I feel like I’m not alone. I write a lot about things I indulge in, but it’s nice to also be praised for “being good.” There just has to be a balance. I don’t want to read a blog about someone who refuses any indulgences and is preachy about it. That just makes me feel awful when I cave in a little. But it’s also nice to know people aren’t super-human!

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  20. says

    I love your line about saying “yes” on occasion. Good way to think about it. “yes” is positive and thus can make people feel like they’re getting something vs. losing out.

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  21. says

    Well said Julie! I have a HUGE sweet tooth, my downfall has always been sweets (ice cream in particular). I have to constantly say no because if it were up to me I’d have sweets at every meal. It’s all about finding a balance.

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  22. says

    I’m glad you went over this, Julie! I think it’s great that you let people know that it’s definitely ok to say no, even in the “everything in moderation” approach, you don’t always have to “give in” to something indulgent just to look like you’re in complete balance – you’ve got nothing to prove to anyone 🙂 You live a lifestyle suited for YOU and that means saying either yes or no regardless of what others may say or think.

    Thanks for this post, it’s good to clear things up, for sure, sometimes people get the wrong impression from reading blogs, they don’t see the whole entire story!

    Enjoy your day, girlfriend!

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  23. says

    I’m so glad that you shared this experience Julie, I think it’s important (helpful) to relate your own struggles to stay on a healthy track.

    Although it’s not always easy to share my deepest struggles on such a public forum I do when it comes to still having urges to return to very unhealthy habits (I am a recovered bulimic). I think so many readers can relate and appreciate that someone shares why these urges come back and how I deal with them and move forward.

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  24. says

    Very well said 🙂 I feel sometimes people think that i am depriving myself, when like you said it is only make trying to make healthier decisions most of the time. I prefer to keep treats/dessert for when I really want them. Example – I am not a cake fan (crazy I know!) so often I pass on cake, only because I know I wouldn’t enjoy it enough for it to be worth it. I would rather have ice cream or a cookie later 🙂

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  25. says

    I completely understand what you’re saying and I don’t think you’re misrepresenting yourself at all. I think that’s what the blog world is all about – seeing how, when people DO say yes to treats and things, they balance it out (with other healthier meals/exercise/etc.)

    I think we all understand and know that you CAN eat whatever you want, but that doesn’t mean you’re ALWAYS eating whatever you want and disregarding nutrition. It’s like Bethenny Frankel says “you CAN have it all – just not all at once!”

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  26. says

    Thanks, Julie! Saying no is definitely the hardest part especially for someone who is just getting into eating healthy and trying to live a healthy lifestyle. My family looks at me like I am crazy if I turn down icecream (after having it 2 days in a row before) or ask for a smaller piece of pie. I don’t feel like I am depriving myself but I am very concerned about what others think. It’s great to hear when others say no and that it’s OK to say no.

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  27. Jaclyn @ Realhealthwife says

    This is such a great post! Now that I started my blog its funny when I’m out and I do get something “unhealthy” and my friends will say, don’t put that on the blog. Of course I will! Like you said, it’s all about healthy living, if you say no to the bread basket, have the frozen yogurt, balance it out! I do feel pressured if I say no to something that everyone else is ordering, like a big dessert, its sometimes a hard decision to make but it’s just not worth it to me sometimes.

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  28. Alex @ The Plum Foodie says

    I definitely think that there’s hesitation out there in the healthy eating blogging community to talk about the times they’ve refused dessert and indulgences. We all, as healthy eating bloggers, share something in common and that is to live a healthy life fueled by truly healthy eats. While that’s true, I think it’s safe to say that we ALL indulge here and there sometimes and that’s A-OK! But since a lot of blogs I read are all about health foods and healthy eating, I can see why a lot of bloggers don’t include all the details about the times they do “let their hair down” when it comes to indulging. Maybe it’s because they don’t want to lose the “trust” of blog readers by making it look like “hey, I don’t practice what I preach, look at what I’m eating today!”

    Probably a confusing reply, but not sure how to put what I feel into words. Great post, Julie.

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  29. DefineDiana says

    Thanks for this post Julie. I read a lot of healthy living blogs, and I’m working on trying to lose over 100lbs. When I read some of these healthy living blogs and I see all the cookies, and treats I sometimes see them eat, I get a bit jealous thinking “why can’t I eat that way?”

    No don’t get me wrong, I’m not trying to deprive myself while loosing weight, but I have to be a bit more strict with my food intake then someone who is at a healthy weight.

    However, your post made me realize that you maintain your weight because you do, in fact, say no to things all the time. I would go out to dinner before, indulge in the bread basket and have dessert! Navigating around situations where maybe the best choices aren’t always easy is something I like to read about in healthy living blogs. How does someone navigate a party when they are living healthfully? Becasue I’m not quite doing it right myself right now.

    I think that this post, and what you show every day is about having a healthy relationship with food, which is the most important thing when trying to live a healthy lifestyle (which can include indulgences!)

    Sorry for the long post 🙂

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    • says

      i love long comments. 🙂 and believe me, you’re not alone in thinking “why can’t i eat that way!?” i think we ALL know people who can eat cheetos all day long and not gain a pound, but that doesn’t mean that’s healthy.

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    • says

      I agree! While I know that this blog focuses on “everything in moderation” and healthy, whole foods most of the time, every once in awhile I’ll see you eating fro yo more than once a week (not judging at all here, I am all for froyo 😀 ) and I’ll think aaaaaaaaaghhhh I WANT TO DO THAT TOO. This is just another reason I love PBF, Julie! You keep it real. You are totally honest about loving sweets and having a weakness for them, but I’m so glad you opened up that you do say no when it makes sense to say no. Rockin. Love it.

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  30. says

    Thanks for the honesty, Julie! It’s so refreshing to read posts like this. I totally agree with you — sometimes you don’t want to write about how you said no, because then people will think you’re a food nazi. It’s nice to show that moderation is key, and that moderation sometimes involves saying no to things you might want.

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  31. says

    I think this is a great post. So often on healthy living blogs I read about indulgences (FRO-YO anyone?!hehe) but I think its also true that there are a lot of instances where all of the healthy, happy, bloggers turn down foods they know aren’t providing much nutritional benefit. BUT I do think it’s important to talk about the delicious indulgences when they do occur, because part of being healthy is being happy, right?!

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  32. says

    Great post Julie! When I committed to being healthier & trying to pay more attention to what I was eating, I definitely had to say “no” more than I was used to! If you’re truly trying to live a healthy lifestyle, you can’t say “yes” to every single indulgence… it’s about balancing the two! (Like your bread basket/dessert reference!)

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    • says

      I love that you say that you had to say no more than you were used to. I think for someone trying to lose weight, it’s *really helpful* to see examples of bloggers who know when to say no — because we ALL know that we don’t need someone telling us to go ahead and have that ice cream, haha. The constant positive attitude toward saying yes to treats is awesome because it teaches us that deprivation isn’t a healthy approach to life, but it can also be misleading or tempting…where you don’t realize that a blogger said yes to ice cream because she said no to the second half of her sandwich earlier in the day.

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  33. Rachel Wilkerson says

    I think there is definitely a taboo in admitting you say no, especially if you are a thin, pretty white woman. People are quick to judge. But I think you nailed it here; pretending you are never tempted is a misrepresentation and might send a message that you HAVE to say yes to every treat to be “balanced.” I think people get really freaked out at any hint of dieting or deprivation.

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  34. says

    I totally agree with you. I feel like a lot of the time when a blogger, especially a popular one, talks about how she didn’t eat X, there is all sorts of backlash about how she ran X number of miles and she shouldn’t deprive herself.

    A lot of these bloggers have come from a place of weight loss and frankly, in order to maintain that weight loss, sometimes you can’t eat everything you want. Sure, I love to eat Doritos and sometimes do, but the sole reason that I don’t eat them every day is because they aren’t healthy and that is an okay reason.

    Not sure if this makes sense. It’s something that I think about a lot though.

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  35. Katie says

    I think it’s hard talking about what you eat in general, and when people expect you to eat one way, you don’t want to “let them down” or even embarrass yourself.

    My sister and I both recently lost a boatload of weight and I get a little jealous of how much more she lost than I did. Sometimes I feel embarrassed telling her about my meals and indulgences. In my crazy, crazy fits I forget that I’m about 3 inches taller and I took on weight training and she did not!

    In reality, I know I’m the only one who gives a hoot about what I eat.

    As for occasional treats, I thank sweet baby Jesus for the mini-dessert fad. I indulged in one last night to celebrate my boyfriend’s finishing the bar 🙂

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  36. Holly @ The Runny Egg says

    This is an interesting topic — I am the same way: sometimes I have dessert, or 2 drinks (or more) and sometimes I say no. It all depends on the day and I think it is up to me to figure out when to say yes and when to say no.

    And yes, sometimes saying “no” to cake is the healthy thing to do, and sometimes saying “yes” to the cake is healthy too!

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  37. says

    As a 20-something girl, I feel like I have to hide the fact that I sometimes say “no” not only in the blog world, but in my real life! Our culture seems to be caught between disordered eating on both ends of the spectrum, and no matter where you fall, people will criticize you for the choices you make. OH well, as they say, haters gonna hate! Love this post – thanks for broaching the topic!

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  38. says

    As a blogger, there are times when I feel I shouldn’t delve TOO much into how many times I say ‘yes’ vs. ‘no’ when it comes to me having a treat. But, when I do bring it up, I generally explain myself; “the reason I couldn’t finish half my entree was because the bread and appetizer were so filling”! Something like that 🙂

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  39. AshleyC says

    I think bloggers are afraid to say that they turn down indulgences because they don’t want to be seen as depriving themselves. I think that it’s sad that making healthy choices is almost frowned upon in this way. You must have an ED because you said no to that cake or those french fries. It’s kind of an oxymoron to say that you “deprive” yourself of an “indulgence.” An indulgence is just that – it’s excess; you don’t need it.

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  40. says

    There’s definitely a line there – say no too much and you’re flirting with an eating disorder, say yes too much and you’re thoughtlessly indulging. Definitely a double-edged sword, but I think *most* readers understand that we don’t write about every single thing that we eat, and that a light meal might be finished a little later with a snack, or that we made room for a huge dessert with a salad earlier. It’s hard to accurately portray things without documenting every single freakin’ thing you eat, but at the end of the day, I think we all understand that yes and no both have a place!

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  41. says

    I feel like sometimes, if I only mention the “NOs” that I said when I used to blog on tumblr, I’d end up getting a LOT of support from the UNhealthy living folks (aka those with EDs that loved to see people successfully depriving themselves) so yes, I definitely can see the risk in too much focus on the NO. But I think that the non-tumblr community, at least the ones I read, are a lot less disordered in their thoughts about food and a lot more supportive of truly healthy living, which is a game of balance in the end.

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  42. Vanessa N says

    So happy to see this post! I’m not a blogger (yet 🙂 )- but I get bored at work a lot so I have about 15 different “healthy living” blogs on my google reader that I’ll scan through.

    I was just thinking to myself yesterday how silly it is that all of these blogs are written by really fit/thin women, yet the majority feel the need to talk about how they eat sooooo much candy and ice cream and chocolate and beer. and i just feel like calling BS on it – b/c no one could eat as much junk as they portray and maintain a healthy lifestyle. (BTW, i don’t include you in that group)

    I think some healthy living bloggers are so afraid to be called out for eating too little or not giving their body enough nutrients to match their activity level – that they exaggerate or misrepresent the amount of things they do indulge in, which is just as damaging to readers trying to have a balanced diet. q: “why can they run five miles and then eat a whole bag of swedish fish and not gain a pound”. a: “they can’t. you wouldn’t burn nearly enough calories to balance that out – they did not eat the whole bag – don’t believe everything you see on the internet” 🙂

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    • says

      Vanessa, I think you explained this REALLY well! It’s probably not always intentional, but I have definitely picked up on what sometimes feels like a need to exaggerate the “bad” stuff so as not to be criticized for the healthy stuff.

      For example, last night I went to a beer and bacon pairing — haha. I could just mention that I went and give the details of the event (5 different beers paired with 5 complementary “flavors” of bacon) and leave it at that to show that I know how to “indulge.” BUT, that wouldn’t take into consideration the fact that I had a giant salad full of veggies and a little bit of quinoa for lunch. I was a little hungrier a little earlier in the evening than usual, but I was fine with it b ecause I knew I’d be treating myself to a fun and more indulgent dinner than usual.

      Sorry for the long-winded response, but in summary, YES! You said it very well 🙂

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  43. says

    I definitely have apprehension to talk about moments of saying “no” to indulgent treats. As a nutrition student, I feel like I get judged all the time for eating “healthy” food. In the past people have said things like, “you’re not gonna eat that cupcake, are you?” or “your’e so healthy, you don’t eat sweets do you” which made me want to say “YES” to sweets even more, just to show them that I DO eat dessert even if I’m a nutrition student. Sometimes it’s a lose-lose situation, since if I opt to say no, then they think I have an eating disorder. I’ve learned to ignore such judgments and comments, but it’s still hard to say or talk about saying “no.”

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  44. says

    I blog about healthy living but I don’t post pictures of everything I eat. However, I do try to maintain healthy choices on a daily basis with 1-2 indulgences a week. Basically I try to follow a 85-90% clean diet.

    This week I was sick and was craving fast food after skipping meals during the day. When I posted that I ate a roast beef sandwich and curly fries for dinner (which I usually never eat), my husband commented that “I should not post that on a healthy living blog”.

    I told him that I am not perfect and I want my blog readers to know that too. I eat healthy because my body feels better when I do, because I am setting an example for my children, and to inspire others to make healthy choices. But I still indulge, I still have cravings and I think it is important to share that with my readers.

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  45. says

    Great topic Julie! I agree that there is a bit of hesitance for me when I’m around people that know I’m conscious of what I eat. Not all of my friends know I have a healthy living blog, but regardless of whether they do or don’t, I’m always conscious of the fact that when I say no, they might be interpreting it as me being too strict. I do like my indulgences on some occasions, but I think making those occasions just once in a while is what makes them more special.

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  46. Jess says

    Great post and such a good point. I think it’s a point that most people forget about …or just like to use as ammunition against healthy living bloggers or just people who are trying to be more healthy in general. I know when I started eating more healthy and turned down certain foods (like a fried group appetizer) or just took a limited portion, some people were so quick to point it out and mention how i was depriving myself to lose weight…Well, duh, I’m gonna limit my intake of stuff that isn’t so healthy for me!

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  47. says

    I am so glad you posted about this. Just this past weekend I was feeling judged by my family, one night we had fajitas and I opted to not use a tortilla because I housed so many chips and salsa pre dinner and the next night we had burgers and I opted for no bun because my mom had also made homemade bread that I ate far too much of. You have to weight your options and if you know you have reached your limit for the day its ok to say no. Knowing when to say yes and no are important for healthy living I think, there are certainly times when I say yes when I should have said no but hey I am only human.

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    • says

      i’ve done that too – opted for bunless pulled pork b/c i knew i’d be going out for ice cream later and i was seriously nervous to post that on the blog b/c i knew the “carb police” would come after me saying “eat the bun” when really i didn’t even want it and just wanted to go big on ice cream 30 min. later!

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  48. says

    I really think saying “no” in general is something you learn to do over time. The older I get the more I realize it is okay to say “no” to a dessert at a dinner because I rather have calories that night in wine or something. Basically…it spills over into life too. You cannot say “yes” to every opportunity …it is all about finding your balance. Saying “no” is very liberating once you get the hang of it but you have to have the confidence to say it!

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  49. says

    yes yes, i feel like people judge a lot of times when you say you are ‘careful’ about what you eat or ‘give up’ and say no to certain things. especially if you are a runner and work out a lot people say, oh whatever… you can eat whatever you want because you work out or because you are thin. not the case tho, you are like that because you care about what you put into your body! agreed. glad you posted this!

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  50. Laura (Cookies vs. Carrots) says

    Really great post! I agree that healthy living means sometimes saying yes, but also sometimes saying no! You have to decide which indulgences are going to be “worth it”!

    I love your blog and this made me love it even more!

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  51. says

    I have just started my own blog recently, and you are sooo right! We never talk about the point in our day when someone offered us a cookie and we turned it down. For one: I think that we possibly fear that it gives a negative vibe to our positive blog atmosphere, and secondly, that is a somewhat “boring” story….I said no to the cookie and then I moved on to the next thing in my day….not much there. I know that we all say everything in moderation, but I recently heard of the 80-20 rule, where 80% of the time we are great healthy eaters, and 20% we indulge a bit…to me, I think it is a great rule to follow…there is a fine line between making it seem like indulgences occur often, and making oneself seem deprived because the blog is only a snapshot of the day…not every single detail……Great post and I am glad you brought that point up! 🙂

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  52. says

    I think this is a wonderful and much needed post (postlette?). I do think that there’s an unspoken aversion to talking about the times when we as bloggers *don’t* partake in decadent treats or sweets…mostly because it’s so obvious how much we do love them! But I completely agree with you that it’s something that’s a very real part of my life, at least, every single day. Learning when to say “yes” and when to say “no” is a balance that’s incredibly difficult to find. While I don’t think it has to be the focus of every blog, per se, I do think it helps for us to acknowledge the reality of our lives once in awhile!

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  53. says

    I think there is probably just as much apprehension about saying “yes”. Too much of either and someone’s going to judge you no matter what. It’s really hard to genuinely and accurately portray every single decision you make in a day when it comes to food on a blog, even if you’re posting 3 times a day. I understand that when reading and take indulgences or restrictions with a grain of salt when I’m reading because obviously that one decision is only a small part of an entire days worth of decisions.

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  54. says

    I started my blog to help me say “no”. It is a way for me to be held accountable for my decisions. I do feel a little pressure not talk about those “no” moments often, because I try to keep my blog positive and upbeat. And I have no problem talking about my weekend indulgences. I never thought about how readers percieve this, and that they may think I don’t say “no”.

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  55. says

    Sometimes I feel apprehensive to talk too much about things that I avoid for fear that someone that “follows me” will misinterpret my motives for saying no. It seems that we can’t document each and every thing (and I would never want to) that we eat or do, so without the entire picture of health I fear that some girls may see certain things and make their own conception of me. I guess it’s hard to grasp that what I post could truly influence someone down a certain path…it’s humbling and yet I consider it a duty to make sure that I offer healthy ideas for everyone 🙂 I really enjoyed this question Julie!

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  56. Deb says

    Julie–I just started reading your blog but have never even thought to comment (which seems so silly to me now). As a recent grad (with a major in PR) I found myself relating to so many of your posts. I just wanted to let you know that I think you are such a great positive influence in the blog world. Your honesty and genuine personality shines through every post! Thank you for shining light on something we all can relate to, but never gets the attention it deserves. Keep keeping it real! 🙂

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  57. says

    I think this was an awesome post! I don’t blog about healthy living, but I do advocate it and, well, live it, and even I feel that pressure. But the truth is, “every now and then” or “occasionally” is just that, and just because I’m saying no doesn’t mean I always do- and it especially doesn’t mean I’m judging others for saying yes! At the end of the day, I’m in charge of my body, and I like to make decisions that (mostly) keep it healthy. I also like to eat cake 😀

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  58. says

    This is such a great post! I have an overly active sweet tooth, and sometimes when I see bloggers post all of their indulgences like it is not big deal, it helps me “justify” mine. Like, “If they are healthy and eat this way, then I can do the same.” The truth is that sometimes I need to scale back and say no to desserts or other treats. It might be more encouraging/helpful to me if we talked more about creating a BALANCE of healthy foods and indulgences, rather than just focusing on what we indulge in. Thanks for bringing this up, Julie!

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  59. says

    Great post! I feel conflicted about what I post sometimes. Sometimes I feel the need to be “perfect” online and hesitate about posting indulgences…yet other times, I feel like people will worry if they don’t see that I’m enjoying myself! But then again, I don’t post every meal throughout the day, so I guess it’s difficult for me to find that balance right now. I agree that healthy living is all about finding that balance — sometimes I say ‘bring it on!” to that chocolate-peanut buttery dessert, and other times I say no because I simply can’t put more food in my belly without being sick. One day at a time!

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  60. says

    Ah! I totally agree. Even outside of the blogging community – with friends or family, sometimes I feel like I’m being judged for making healthy decisions, and I feel like I should explain that it’s all about balance, and I do splurge a lot, etc. etc. Eventually, I just got over it and decided people could judge me if they want. I know what makes me feel good, at the end of the day. 🙂

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  61. says

    I am not a healthy living blogger, but do try to make healthy decisions. Sometimes I do feel a little uncomfortable with healthy living blogs because it sometimes seems like people are robots about healthy living – that they are never tempted to choose the wrong food, always perfect about eating, etc, & makes me wonder why I’m not that way. I so appreciate your honesty 🙂

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  62. says

    Great topic!

    I certainly feel like there is a fear of talking about the moments you turned food down out of fear of the backlash. It’s difficult posting about the food you eat since it opens you up to a lot of criticism. Everybody has an opinion over what a person should be eating and will judge a lot based on personal appearance (i.e. you’re too skinny! you should have eaten a second piece of cake.)

    But I think that healthy living ultimately comes down to balance, so I think it’s important to discuss the times that we say YES! and no. Otherwise, it’s easy to gain the percepetion that a blogger is always depriving or indulging themselves.

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  63. says

    I think choosing a balance instead of always feeling you have to go without is a perfect way to look at healthy living. I choose fries over a side salad sometimes too. I think indulging is fine and totally normal.

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  64. says

    Thank you for this post! I often struggle with the concept of “cheating”….should it be one meal a week or one day? How much is too much? Either way, I find myself saying “no” quite a bit. Sometimes it REALLY stinks, and sometimes I feel great about myself for doing it. It’s all about living a healthy lifestyle, and I can make that happen with the promise of some ice cream here and there 🙂

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  65. Carolyn says

    Bah! Thank you Julie, for this post! Confession: I started to tear up halfway through reading the comments. It’s SO GOOD to know that we all have the same struggles. And that there are so many people out there who believe in healthy, balanced living. I’m also blown away by all the positive comments and support on your blog. You’ve really created an incredible community of people here and it’s because of honest posts like this one, that address REAL day-to-day issues, like staring down m&ms in the morning (story of my life) and consciously choosing a healthier option. I think I’m rambling, so I’ll just end this comment by say THANK YOU and kudos for being 100% you!

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  66. says

    Honest question: do you think you would say “No” more often than “Yes” when your indulgences ended up adding the pounds significantly? you are young, have a healthy metabolism and exercise quite a bit so you can afford to indulge in the 3rd piece of birthday cake. But if there would be more “consequences” do you think you would indulge in the same way?

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    • says

      yes, i do think i would try my best to say “no” more often in that case. i know metabolism changes overtime, as will my schedule and exercise regimen, so i am sure my decisions will also need to adjust. if i train for a marathon one day, i may say “yes” more… if my routine slows down, i may try to say “no” more.

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  67. says

    This is a GREAT post! When I first started reading healthy living blogs, I would focus more on people’s indulgences, because sometimes it seemed like that made up the majority of their diets. I kind of fell into the trap of thinking that if other people could indulge and maintain a healthy lifestyle, I could, too!

    Unfortunately I took it over the top and ate WAY too much sugar for a couple weeks…so it’s great to hear you talk about how sometimes restraint IS necessary! Thanks!

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  68. says

    Saying no is the hardest part of being healthy sometimes! When I choose to pass on a food or something that might be considered unhealthy, my friends and family might give me a look or say something like “come on its just a cookie, don’t deprive yourself”…. but little do they know I am actually sayig no because I had two cookies earlier in the day. It is all about finding a balance, but some people like to judge more than understand which can make it hard!

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  69. Dana says

    Great post Julie! I completely agree with you on this. I feel like I deal with this all the time. I am not a blogger but I am known as the “healthy one” in my family and group of friends. I always want to prove that I can eat cake, ice cream, and french fries all that I want, because for some reason, its seems easier than to just refuse or go against the grain and explain myself.

    Sometimes i would rather have the fruit than the cookie though! (and sometimes its the complete opposite haha). I think the idea of moderation/saying “no” or “yes” to certain foods should be more in the open. I love when I realize that others/bloggers share these similar feelings. Thank you so much for your honesty Julie! I love your blog!!

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  70. says

    Thank you for this post. I often feel like certain bloggers who blog about all the desserts and unhealthy foods they eat, while still looking amazing, and misrepresenting what a healthy diet should look like. Most of us can’t eat dessert every day and still be at a healthy weight. I’ve found myself before trying to make excuses for bad choices by saying “well… so and so ate this last night… it’s probably ok”. When really, it’s not, and I know if I eat cookies all the time I will gain weight. I definitely think it’s a good idea to show that it’s ok to indulge sometimes and not deprive ourselves, but healthy diets don’t include lots of processed sugar… even if they also include broccoli.

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  71. Alison says

    Julie, I think that (for me) your blog represents how to eat consciously. You don’t NOT think about what you are eating, if that makes sense. For me, that is the key to healthy eating/living… if you are eating that 3rd slice of cake, its because you consciously know that you can, you will work harder at the gym, ect…

    Thanks for always being so honest, open and happy 🙂 your blog is a nice break to my day!

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  72. Jamie says

    As a newbie blogger, I try to post almost everything I eat, which tends to include a lot of things I should say “no” to. As a blog reader, I appreciate that you do indulge and say so! Sometimes I feel like healthy living bloggers are never even confronted with temptation, and therefore never have to think about saying “no.” I love that you keep it real enough to realize that you have the choice to say “yes” or “no.”

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  73. says

    I definitely think there’s apprehension for bloggers to say when they made the healthy decision to not indulge. There are a lot of negative commenters out there that would jump on that chance. I don’t think anyone should keep it a secret if they choose not to have cookies after dinner if they had cookies with lunch. That knowledge helps others out there who struggle with making those choices. As a fellow blogger, I think it’s completely fine to tell people when I indulge and when I don’t. It’s about what’s good for me!

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  74. says

    I think that most bloggers don’t want to appear too strict with their food so they throw in the attitude of “I eat what my body wants” and sometimes highlight too much about the treats (aka. Fro-yo with a million toppings every second post).

    I think they might worry that if they write “I turned down 3 cookies today” it’ll look unhealthy (mindset wise) if that makes sense.

    I think with any blog, you have to take it with a grain of salt because the blogger is only showing what they want to show you…

    I hope this made sense… with my wedding 8 sleeps away my minds a little busy.

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  75. says

    I do actually. I think what bothers me most is how many people feel like it’s such a shock or taboo to say NO to a workout one day, as if a rest day is the plague!

    I work out 4x’s wk (at most 5) and sometimes only 3x’s and I am quite healthy. It drives me nuts that people can’t say No in either direction.

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  76. Nadya says

    i am simply blog reader, but for me personally sharing your “no” situations would be even more interesting, after all this is part of living healthy. Furthermore, it gives me strength and power to say “no” when I am in similar situation and I want to indulge, but I know I shouldn’t do it… so I will be thinking of you – you someone else can say “no”, I can do it too 🙂

    Great post!

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  77. says

    Definitely true! I think your own body knows when you should say no and knows when you should say yes. Side of fries instead of a salad one day – sure, you deserve a break! M&M’s because your bored – just say no! 😉

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  78. Shayla @ The Good Life says

    Yes I feel there is apprehension to say no…especially since I’ve opened up about my past disordered eating struggles…I feel that if I were to ever say no, people will assume I’m reverting back to my old habits when in reality I’m not…I’m just simply trying to maintain my healthy balanced lifestyle by eating nutritious, wholesome food (which I truly do enjoy!) and a few indulgences here and there…and yes, that means I will sometimes say no or yes 🙂

    Great post Julie, and as always, love your honesty 🙂

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  79. Marci B says

    Just a dessert idea that i LOVE and will subsitute when i am craving ice cream or something chocolate..

    Plain greek yogurt with some nutella mixed in… Its not the HEALTHIEST thing you can eat, but it tastes amazing and I dont feel as gulity eating that as i would a bowl of chocolate ice cream.

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  80. Christina says

    I really appreciate this post and I think once in a while its good to show that you do have to say “no” to be healthy. Within the past year I lost a lot of weight and unfortunately put some back on and am trying to successfully lose it and keep it off this time & sometimes I feel like after reading all these blogs I’m the only one that has to say no to maintain a healthy and moderate life. Thanks for recognizing this issue and keep up the great work on ur blog, it is without a doubt one of my favs!!

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  81. says

    I am more of a fitness/recipe/mom blog, but sometimes I hesitate when I give my son something people decide isn’t right for him to eat. I then remind myself that if I never let him have sweets or the occasional fast food nugget, it would make it that much more appealing and he’d be more likely to rebel in the future.

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  82. says

    I think a few years ago, lots of blogs were all about saying “no”, but certain bloggers caught flack for focusing too much on that. Now, I think it is more acceptable to admit when you said “yes” OR “no” to certain things, because it shows that the person behind the blog is real.

    As for my blog, I consider anytime I go out to eat and NOT order french fries a huge victory in the “I said ‘no'” department! 🙂

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  83. says

    This is a really interesting post. As a new blogger, I find it almost uncomfortable to post ANYTHING I eat because I feel like there is always some degree of scrutiny that goes along with it. I think that people should read blogs through a not-so-serious lens, and realize that what they see on blogs does not reflect what goes on in actual life. If I photograph a salad for lunch and nothing else, don’t assume that’s all I ate! Likewise, if I said I ate 3 slices of pie for dessert, don’t assume I do that every night.

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  84. Jen says

    I don’t like when a blogger seems like she indulges all the time because it is simply not true. I see you making healthy choices quite often, but also eating snacks/desserts. Some bloggers tend to talk about how they eat these ridiculously indulgent, rich meals all time and do yoga 1 or 2 days a week and maintain their petite body frame. Yes, this might be true, but it reminds me of celebrities who claim they were just born with the ability to eat crap all day and not work out. Doubt it, in most cases. Anyway, point being, I like you acknowledging that you do exercise, do choose vegetables and fruits and wholesome meals even when that sweet tooth is saying otherwise 🙂

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  85. Lizzy says

    GREAT post Julie. It’s all about the small, every day choices. I think you’re right that the blogging community is worried about people overanalyzing bloggers meals and being quick to call it depravation. It’s not! You nailed it on the head!

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  86. R. Chandra says

    haha, this kind of reminds me of opening up US Weekly and reading a quote from some super-thin celebrity saying how much they love to eat cheeseburgers and dessert when they are asked about their fitness routine. it is SO retarded! there’s this weird appeal of being skinny and fit but then denying the reality of what you really do to stay there – creating some sort of magical illusion of yourself, lol! i guess i get it, from a “look-at-me-be-envious-of-me” standpoint, but, staying along the celebrity line, i much prefer the ones that say, hey, yeah, DUH i am restricting myself and pushing myself to the limits with exercise and it’s hard but i need to look the way i do!

    obviously, most healthy living blog writers have a much more realistic , happier approach to their diet/fitness routines, body goals and mental attitude.. which i love! 🙂

    however, i always like reading 100% honesty – controversial, triggering, whatever. own it.

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  87. Kyra says

    Great post Julie! Saying “no” is something everyone struggles with in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. I find the most helpful way to combat having to “choose” is to plan my meals ahead of time. Then, when an occasion comes up that will include indulgences (going out to dinner, drinks, whatever), I don’t have to feel bad about saying yes!

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  88. says

    I think that’s a great point, and it was something I was actually thinking about discussing on my blog, as well. The past couple of weeks, I’ve been posting about birthday cake, lasagna, fish and chips, cupcakes, ice cream… and don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed every morsel of those treats. But because I don’t post every single thing I eat, the readers don’t always see my oatmeal for breakfast, my big salad for lunch… the fact that I try to balance things out. So I think that your post is perfect and very well-received. 🙂

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  89. says

    Great post!
    Yes!! As a blogger, I often feel similar to you, in the sense that saying “no” doesn’t have to mean deprivation and it IS about making a healthy decision. There are plenty of times when I’ve wanted more of “X, Y, and Z” but I know my limits (well, most of the time).
    On the other hand, I agree that it is important to share the fact that we can all indulge every now and then without having to think twice about it. Like you said…sometimes the third piece of cake is just absolutely necessary. 😉

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  90. Lindsey says

    It’s ironic that I read this post after reading a few Eden Eats Everything posts from the past week or two (do you read? it’s awesome).

    While some may appreciate your honesty in admitting that sometimes you have cravings that you push away, my personal opinion is that it sends the wrong message. It almost sounded like you were proclaiming your ability to refuse unhealthy foods.

    One of the main reasons I love reading your blog is that you never ONCE have written about a meal you ate and then gave the vibe that you felt guilty for eating it. PBF makes it clear that you have a well balanced diet because you eat everything in moderation, listen to your stomach and genuinely enjoy food. It could be dangerous to announce that you sometimes say no to sweets because it could be triggering to readers who look up to you and think they, too, have to say no to a piece of chocolate. You’re getting so many comments from people telling you how proud they are for saying no to food – that is SO NOT the message of your blog and I would hate to see it go that way.

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    • says

      as i was writing this post, sending the “wrong message” definitely crossed my mind. i would never want ANYONE to think i’m encouraging saying “no” all the time or encouraging deprivation, because in no way am i trying to do that. i am just saying that – for me – if i honestly ate whatever i wanted every day w/no regard to healthy choices, i would eat ice cream all day long. i really, sincerely hope that you and other readers don’t think i’m praising the ability to resist indulgent treats because i’m really not. i’m just saying resisting indulgent food from time to time is part of my personal healthy living journey. i didn’t want everyone to think i ate whatever i wanted all day every day and wanted to make sure i wasn’t misrepresenting myself.

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      • Sarah says

        I’m glad you wrote this post, but I’m sad that you feel like you have to defend yourself. I understand why your doing it…if you didn’t you would get destroyed in the comments. But sometimes (actually a lot of time) part of being healthy is saying no to dessert, even if you didn’t eat half of a bread basket. With over half of our country overweight or obese, I think we could all afford to say no more often!

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      • Rose says

        The thing is though that we can already tell that you don’t say yes to every single craving for junk food as we don’t see you posting junk food all day haha 😛 . To be honest I didn’t think that you needed to clarify this with your bloggers. No one thinks you over indulge, hence why people are praising you for having such a healthy and [balanced] diet. I agree with Lindsey though. This post didn’t necessarily send over the right vibes. Like she said, one of the main reasons people enjoy your blog is because you aren’t one of those people who claim how guilty they feel after eating something unhealthy that they crave. It’s okay to eat whatever you crave, just as long as that’s not all your going to eat for the rest of the day.

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  91. says

    I think it can totally go both ways.. I sometimes read blogs where the author seemingly allows any food. Like you eat whatever you want and are just OK with it. And sometimes, I get that angry jealousy feeling – like, SURE, she can eat whateverrr she wants and not gain weight! (even though I know thats not true!)

    However, other times I’ll read a blog where the author details all the things he or she CAN’T have and how strong they are for saying NO to those things… and I get annoyed like – yah, we get it, we ALL say no to those things every day and you just gotta do it without complaining!

    But see, it can go both ways. I think that a blog like yours and Janetha’s are the perfect balance. I love that you show the little indulgences but I can easily see how you healthily counteract those indulgences with your other food and exercise choices throughout the day.

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  92. says

    great post! However, I admire all your healthy choices and I never think you are indulgent. your meal choices are so well-balanced and you take such good care of yourself you deserve a few “indulgent meals!” It’s obvious that you just bring balance in your life. if you were always posting that you only ate healthy stuff..I’d send you some junk food! keep sharing..we love it!

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  93. says

    I absolutely agree that being healthy means saying no! You’re right in that it’s not necessarily an act of deprivation, but it’s knowing how to balance indulgences with healthy eating. It’s always a choice and sometimes you have to say no to something unhealthy to keep that balance. As for blogging about it, I think it’s good to be honest but it’s not crucial to talk about with each decision that you make. Sometimes if I have to think hard or really resist something super unhealthy I’ll mention it in my blog, but I usually say why I say no (like, well I had a cupcake 2 hours ago, so shouldn’t eat this brownie, type of thing..)

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  94. says

    This was a good post. I follow a lot of fitness and health blogs and am often astonished at the level of judgment that readers apply — it’s like they are waiting for the blogger to “trip up!” *shakes head*

    I have a complete inability to understand “food judgment” in general. For example, I actually don’t like sweets (I know – shocker!) So when I’m offered something sweet, I often say “no thanks” only to be met with “oh, come on now, you can afford to eat it!”

    The healthly living blog world seems to take food judgment to the extremes, which is unfortunate. So thanks for keepin’ it real, Julie!

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  95. says

    I think, in general, people scrutinize and criticize healthy living bloggers WAY to much when it comes to their food. It’s pretty ridiculous.

    It’s almost like celebrities can never win — they’re perceived as too fat or too thin.
    Bloggers, in a similar way, can never win.
    If they blog about turning down candy people think they have an eating disorder ….ridiculous.

    EXCELLENT topic lady!

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  96. says

    Any of my friends can tell you I am pretty weak in the saying “no” category. I’m really good at eating healthy, even when we go out to eat (which is more than it probably should be), but the saying no to that glass of [insert any alcoholic beverage] to sip on or to happy hour with apps is HARD. I love the social part. If I didn’t go I would feel like I was missing out. But only recently have I been still going but sticking to water. I thought at my first my friends would turn up their noses, but instead, I have gotten comments that don’t make me feel so bad about my choices. and guess what? My body feels healthy too! I realized I was having that glass of wine, not because I wanted it, but because I thought it was the right thing to do. Now I feel great sticking to water, and sharing in the company anyway 🙂

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  97. Mary says

    You’re just keeping it honest I’d say. I think people who deprive themselves of treats completely are fooling themselves and the rest of the world. I know people like that and then you see them sneaking treats when they think nobody is looking. (therefore all the candy wrappers etc. in their cars) HAHAHA

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  98. Linda says

    I think there’s those who say no to everything and those who say yes more frequently. I love how honest you are. Sometimes you want that cake/cookie/candy but you adjust the rest of your based on that indulgence. You definitely help me make better choices!

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  99. says

    Hey Julie,
    I fully appreciate how you post your daily indulgences and I loved how you ate a bowl of Fruit Loops like it was no big deal. I might add that Fruit Loops are the JAM!

    However, I agree that it’s sometimes difficult to talk about the foods that are turned down for fear of being labeled as having an extreme eating disorder! Yes, that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but it’s true.

    I think you have a good balance between whole foods and daily indulgences, and I strive to do the same.

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  100. says

    All my friend say I have like an iron will because it’s fairly easy for me to say no to sweets if I’ve committed to not having any that particular day. But if I haven’t set any boundaries for myself, forget it. I’ll eat 30 oreos and half a can of frosting. Haha. Unfortunately, my personality lends itself more towards “all or nothing” kind of perspective, but I’m working on mellowing it out. I’m trying to lose a few pounds I gained on the honeymoon, but I ate cake yesterday. 🙂

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  101. says

    I see where you are coming from, usually you see bloggers on the extremes, either making it completely obvious they restrict themselves “I really wanted the froyo but I knew I had an apple waiting for me at home” or only showing the no boundary side of themselves “I had pizza, then we went out for froyo”
    In all honesty, I really see something wrong with the first one, but the second one really isn’t bad. Yea, we don’t want to misrepresent ourselves, I totally get that. This is a really hard subject to cover because some people may start thinking you’re not showing us the real picture of how you eat…but it’s really impossible to show even a little of the “saying no” side of your life without sounding restrictive.
    After my rambling, kudos to you for posting this. I get what you’re saying!

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  102. says

    What an honest post- thank you.. so refreshing. As both a blog reader and blogger, I def agree with you.. I see a lot of bloggers that seem to try and make themselves look perfect, or even the complete opposite even though you can tell that they’re not actually ONLY eating hummus sandwiches and oats every day, you know? It’s like sometimes those in this community are afraid to just be human, and recognize that hey- sometimes we do want M&Ms and extra cheese and lots of french fries, and have to actively CHOOSE to take the healthy road.

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  103. Kerstin Spangner says

    Thanks for the great post. I think saying “no” sometimes is an important part of staying healthy. Not depriving yourself, but making healthy choices (oatmeal instead of M&Ms for breakfast and fruit instead of cake) is important. Your readers also have to remember that you can say “yes” more often than someone like me because you exercise much more. I’m just not strong enough to do some of your workouts (although I am working on getting there).

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  104. Amanda says

    I’m still pretty new to your blog, but this is one of my favorite posts from you (you know, besides all the awesome wedding ones! 😉 It came at a perfect time for me too. I think a lot of time people fall into the trap of comparing themselves to others. The problem with that is, you only see what people want you to see. So you are comparing yourself to something that isn’t real. “She’s so pretty” “He’s so successful” but the truth is everyone has strengths and weaknesses and no one gets everything they want. Thanks for reminding us that life is a balance of saying yes and no 🙂

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  105. Rosa - Fitness, Food, Fulfilled says

    Being perfect is totally overrated, because sustaining that lifestyle can really trigger rebellious stages. I’ve struggled that with my entire life; being diet perfect and losing weight then rebounding and gaining back the weight. Now I have a new perception of healthy living and it’s working much better for me, because like you, I love eating healthy most of the time yet also indulging my cravings without going overboard. Great post!

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  106. Felicia @ Ellipticizing says

    I think being healthy means being balanced, such as passing on dessert if you start your meal with a lot of bread. I think it’s also about planning! If you know you’re going to have a big indulgent dinner, I think it’s good to have a lighter fresher lunch. But at the same time I don’t think anyone should judge anyone else’s eating habits. If someone wants cake for breakfast, it’s not hurting me. I trust that they know what they’re doing with their own body. And who doesn’t want cake for breakfast every now and then?

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  107. Jamie @ snacktress says

    This is a great post, Julie! I’m an everyday-reader, but rare commenter.

    I really appreciate your approach to a healthy lifestyle. I, too, think saying “no” is the hardest part in a way. Whether it’s the fear of being judged for being “so healthy”, being questioned about disordered thinking, or being judged for “contradicting” oneself (indulging and then “resisting”).

    I’m trying to find that balance every day, and just not give a shiz what anyone else thinks. If I feel like eating cake for breakfast (and I very well may – it was my bro’s birthday yesterday and I made THE BEST cake EVAR) I’m going to, if I feel like saying “no” to the homemade sweets a colleague brought in, I will.

    I think I may begin commenting more 🙂 Thanks for the bomb-ass post.

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  108. says

    I think this is a really important point. Health living is about finding a balance in the things you say ‘yes’ to.

    In regards to blogging I think its tricky because its much more fun to document the ridiculously delicious ice cream sundae you indulged in than the 3 times you said no to the cookies in the office kitchen during the work day.

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  109. Anna Was says

    Great, great post! We live in a society where it is very easy to judge other people and of course insert their opinion. I am a Dietitian that specializes in disordered eating and am frequently judged by my choices. They are either too healthy or not healthy enough. There is little grey are when people find out what I do for my profession. People also expect me to be pencil thin and I am not. I am at a very healthy weight and find it easy to maintain with balance. For my family I have adopted the policy that we eat well 90% of the time and have fun 10% of the time. My kids are huge fruit and vegetable eaters but also love to bake, plus we get together with friends frequently. We are usually asked to bring dessert (how ironic)! We try to make a fruit based item but sometimes chocolate chip cookies are on the menu and that is okay. It is all about balance. I love the fact that you are honest on your blog and chuckle to myself when you say you had granola for dinner. I truly wonder what some of your readers think about that! Keep doing what you do and enjoy your food!

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  110. says

    Thank you for addressing this topic, it’s not something that always comes up. It’s important for people to realize that there are plenty of opportunities in their lives, not just “healthy” people to say either yes or no to indulgences. But isn’t that what makes eating a handful of M&Ms or a slice of cake an indulgence? It’s something you do once and awhile to make it a treat. If you ate whatever you wanted whenever you wanted, it wouldn’t be special and you certainly wouldn’t look forward to it as much as if it were a once or twice a week thing?

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  111. says

    I often feel apprehensive about putting the junk food out there that I occasionally eat. I feel like I’ll be judged harshly for those decisions. It’s an interesting line to walk. I think you do a great job of balance and clearly you’re working your booty off each morning at the gym. 🙂

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  112. says

    I love your description of healthy eating. Ellyn Satter, an RD, therapist, author and lecturer has a beautiful definition of healthy eating that tremendously helped me to overcome disordered eating. You can read it here: http://www.ellynsatter.com/what-is-normal-eating-i-62.html

    I try to demonstrate balance on my blog because that’s how I live. I show some healthy options and some more “fun” options, and I don’t go into too much detail about how much or how little I eat because, honestly, I try very hard to listen to my body. I like women to discover for themselves what balance means to them, and I hope that I can help be a role model for that.

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  113. says

    What a great post! Sometimes I actually feel like my blog ends up consisting around indulgences instead of my healthy lifestyle! I mean come on, indulgences are always more fun and great for pictures! lol…but I definitely agree that there are times where you just say “no” and it could be for a number of reasons, but we obviously have to have balance.

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  114. says

    Such an important topic. Especially in blogging, but even at work lunches or just out to dinner, people are judgmental about what you eat. But really, no one can judge you unless they know everything. No one knows what you have already eaten that day, that week, or intend to eat later that night.
    As long as YOU are being healthy, occasionally indulging, and are happy, that’s all that matters.
    Great post, Julie!

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  115. says

    I think there is such an emphasis on “balance” in the healthy living community, but people tend to highlight their indulgences rather than the times they say no to something. There seems to be some apprehension about sharing the fact that healthy living does in fact involve being healthy and making smart food/exercise choices not all of the time, but most of the time.

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  116. says

    I don’t think you misrepresent yourself at all. I get the vibe that you are good at balance. If anything I think I read a lot of healthy living blogs or tweets and get the impression that I all people say is “no”. On a lot of blogs im waiting for the day that someone admits they indulged…and I don’t see indulging as cheating…i think that everyone is allowed to have a sweet tooth or a salty craving and indulge in it. Like you said its just not doing it ALL the time. But if anything I think there is more of the “what I ate that was healthy” out there over the “look at the fantastic dessert I had” posts. Just as we claim we need to have a balance of good vs unhealthy food we need need to have a balance of the types of posts! Thanks for all the great posting you do!

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  117. says

    I’m a new blogger, and this is something I definitely noticed was missing in the blogger community. I’ve touched on the subject in one of my previous posts, but I think it is important for people to realize more that it’s ok to indulge as long as every single meal isn’t an indulgence. Thanks for your honesty!

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  118. says

    Well I think you don’t have to put pressure on yourself, nobody’s perfect and your body can speak for itself, I mean, when you want fruit, you’ll have fruit. Of course sometimes you say no, but never forget to say yes, because to me a healthy living is all about balance. Definitely balance, eat according to your hunger and a great variety of food is the secret of a healthy living.

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  119. says

    Sometimes I say no because I know I need the energy for my day from eating healthily. Like, if I eat donuts for breakfast I know i’ll feel sluggish and yucky. I love eating good food bc it helps me feel good, but on occasion a little sweetness is oh sooo goooood!

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  120. says

    Thanks for the great post Julie! It’s so true. You have to have balance in your food just like you do in life. I hate it when celebrities say, “Oh I eat whatever I want all the time and don’t gain weight”. That is ridiculous and it makes the rest of us feel bad and sets us up for failure.

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  121. says

    I think its hard in the blog world whether its healthy living or about baking to get across to readers that not everything on screen is eaten by the blogger herself. However, I personally can tell that if a blogger is thin and in shape that they probably do say no to many tempations. I think this is just like the disclaimer debate, should you need one after certain posts? or should the reader use their judgement. It’s a gray area.

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  122. says

    THANK YOU Julie.

    I have to be honest, since I started following a few Healthy Living blogs sometimes I get a little down on myself because it seems these skinny/healthy/beautiful women can eat gobs of PB and chocolate and reeses and not gain a pound! I think your blog does a good job overall on showing that if you *spoil* yourself for one meal you’ll make up for it with extra veggies the next 🙂 And feel free to write more about looking into the pantry and being tempted by raisonettes — I think a lot of us can relate!!

    Also, you can tell by your workouts that you bust your butt to earn those splurges – keep it up! I tried out your latest treadmill Incline workout Tuesday night and got a nice sweat going after the 30min 🙂

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  123. says

    I love this post Julie! I think balance and moderation is key…how fun would life be if we could never have any fro yo or a yummy piece of chocolate cake…or even those little mini desserts at Seasons 52 (YUM)? But it’s all in moderation.

    I think the point is that you eat healthy MOST of the time, but allow yourself to have those little indulgences here and there. I think your blog does a nice job of showing that you eat healthy most of the time, you exercise regularly, but also indulge which let’s face it is just plain FUN!

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  124. says

    This is a great post. I try to make sure that I always show my indulgences, I guess to make sure that I’m showcasing how my hard work has paid off, even with the occasional brownie. But I’ve often had people comment, asking if I’m sure this is a “healthy blog”.
    I guess you just can’t win them all.

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  125. Sarah says

    I read an interview of Gweneth Paltrow that asked her how she looked so good after having kids. Her response? “Because I work my ass off!”. The bottom line is that to be healthy and maintain your figure the way you want it requires choices. The answer doesn’t have to be no all of the time, but it does most of the time.

    When I was interning a while back, a lady in the office offered me cake at 9am…9am! I didn’t want to turn it down because I was the new, young, thin intern and I didn’t want to come across the wrong way. But why should I have to feel guilty for turning down cake at nine in the morning just to make other people feel better?? I think that a lot of the “deprivation” accusations are people projecting their insecurities on to others.

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  126. Mae says

    I agree with all the positive feedback. I appreciate that you’re a real person, and you have occasional indulgences, but I think it’s important for your readers to know that eating right and exercising takes effort. It’s a conscious decision, and it’s not always easy or comfortable. I think some people might look at you if they think you always just eat whatever you want, and they might think, “Gosh, I eat whatever I want too – why am I 30 lbs overweight?” So it’s encouraging to know that you’re a normal person, and you DO have to say no sometimes, but it’s a balance. Thanks for having the courage to share!

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  127. Julia says

    Every week on Thursday some friends of mine get together and have pizza for lunch. I usually pack my lunch because I feel a bit lethargic all afternoon if I eat pizza for lunch. One day, I had been in a hurry when packing my lunch box and I forgot my sandwich, so I ate two slices of pizza. One friend commented, “Wow, Julia, I’ve never seen you give in to unhealthy food before.” I realized when he said that that all he ever sees me eat is healthy packed lunches and doesn’t know that I have ice cream at least once a week and some small treat everyday, or that my fiancee and I have deep dish pizza night once a month. I think this is how food bloggers who don’t blog all meals end up in situations where saying no looks disordered. If you only show the healthy stuff saying no to an indulgent treat looks a little bit nutty, but the people reading your blog don’t know that you had two bowls of coconut ice cream last night.

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  128. Katherine says

    I’m so glad that you decided to write this post. As a blog reader (not blogger) I definitely see the pressure that is put on bloggers to eat healthfully but not TOO healthfully. There are some readers out there who, when they detect any sign of “deprivation”, attack the blogger for having an eating disorder, being too skinny, etc.
    I don’t understand how people can view turning down a second martini or having fruit instead of cake for dessert every now and then as a sign of a serious eating disorder. That is called a healthy choice.
    It drives me nuts and sometimes I am ashamed to post a comment as “just” a reader because there are so many readers who have nothing but judgmental things to say and I don’t want to be in the same category as them.
    Bloggers put themselves out there every single day and it’s not fair for others to constantly scrutinize you for making healthy, informed choices.

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  129. says

    I love your post! As much as I indulge, I do also work hard at maintaining my figure through working out and eating healthily. Today I had actually gone out for lunch and my cousin refused to order dessert if I wouldn’t share. I felt a little guilty and agreed…two minutes later, something clicked inside of me and I told her ‘actually no, I really am not up for dessert so order if you like but I probably won’t have a bite’. On those days where I DO want to indulge, lord knows I will but I also have to be smart about it i.e. indulge when I actually want it as opposed to doing so as a way to please others.

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  130. Anonymous says

    I just want to say that this post brought tears to my eyes. I have been struggling so terribly lately with a new binge/compulsive overeating addiction….and it’s getting really bad. I have been reading “food/healthy living” blogs for about a year now, and I am in constant depression over seeing how amazingly awesome your (and others) figure is and yet you still seem to be able to eat cake, peanut butter and whatever else. I AM NOT SAYING THIS IN A SNOTTY WAY AS TO DISCOUNT YOUR WORKOUT ETHIC!!!! I am just saying that yes, sometimes it is very hard to watch bloggers eat such amazing things, that it almost seems unfair at times that no matter how hard I work out, I can’t seem to find a healthy enough relationship to have “just one”….so yea, I have to say no in order to not go overboard. I guess what I am saying is kudos to you, Julie for thinking of the variety of people who may be reading your blog, and taking in your food choices in comparison to their own. I appreciate you being so honest about actually having to say no sometimes…because reading blogs where everybody is preaching about “never depriving” is sometimes hard when you have opposite issues and are also trying to lose weight, because you need to. So thanks for your honesty.

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  131. says

    Thanks for this post! I definitely agree with you. I think a healthy lifestyle is all about balance. Indulging when you want and saying no sometimes in favor of healthier options.

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  132. says

    I love this post! You are completely right! A lot people don’t talk about the times when they said no because saying yes is much more interesting and has better pictures! lol! Seriously though, good topic!

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  133. says

    this is very interesting! you really do rarely see the “saying no” aspect. just “this is what i ate” and for me, who has a VERY difficult time saying no, wonder if others naturally gravitate towards fruit and veggies over a candy bar or chips…very interesting to know. 🙂

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  134. says

    I think ever since the Marie Claire incident there is apprehension to appear as if you are depriving yourself. To me, healthy living is about finding a balance that works for you. As a blogger though, if I’m being honest, there are times where I’ll think, “Oh, maybe I shouldn’t write about that because it doesn’t appear to be healthy living and making a healthy choice.” But most of the time I do because I take pride in being honest and reflective with myself as well as with my readers. If I denied myself indulgences every once in a while, I would not find that healthy. If I indulged constantly, I would not find that healthy. It’s all about balance!

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  135. says

    I do think there is, but I think it goes both ways kinda. Like, you get some backlash for vocalizing that you said no because, like you said, people accuse you of “deprivng” yourself. but then sometimes you get backlast from saying yes a lot because then people are like “well, how are an advocate for a healthy lifestyle if you eat cake all the time?” (I’ve heard both!) You just have to know what works for your body and go with no AND yes equally.

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  136. Rose says

    I see what you are saying. It’s all about balance. Yes you should indulge and not feel guilty, but at the same time you can’t only be eating junk food. Only eating junk food or depriving yourself are both really unhealthy. It’s okay to have all the treats you desire, as long as you are balancing it with the healthy things you love too. Like eating a whole grain sandwhich with almond butter and banana for lunch and then having a chocolate bar after. The most important thing to do is listen to your body. Does your body really want another salad? Does your body really want a 10th cookie? As long as people actually listen to their bodies and not ignore them then they will truely be living a healthy lifestyle.

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  137. Sarah @ Sarah's Modern Bites says

    What a GREAT topic. I especially related to the statement you made about the fact that saying ‘no’ sometimes ISN’T deprivation… it is an attempt at trying to be healthier and BALANCED. Readers… and people around us in life don’t know what food choices we make and are faced with on a 24/7 basis. Yet inherently, our choices… everyones, are being judged all the time. Not necessarily in a bad way but still judged. Saying ‘no’ in front of someone who said ‘yes’ or visa versa is a pretty dynamic situation indeed and my brain is like mush now at the end of the work day I cannot think deeply into anything. But I DID want to comment! 🙂

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  138. Nathan Miller says

    I feel its never an issue to say no or turn down food in which you dont feel right about eating at the time. I think it shows amazing self control and will power, and some people would PAY to have that type of physical and mental commitment to health! But there are certain times and certain people (like myself) who take weight loss and control too far) And if your saying no to something excludes others or makes choices for others then yes there is a line that it crosses, but for the most part, as long the the decision is only affecting you and no one else then its fine to say no all the time if you want

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  139. says

    Like some other people, I also thought you rarely said no and was envious of all you could eat! However, I reminded myself that you also work out almost daily which allows you to have the treats you have. So really, I should only be envious of your motivation to stay healthy and your willpower to wake up early to work out every day! I think that your ability to have balance in your life (the ability to say yes and no) makes you the perfect example of someone who lives a healthy lifestyle.

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  140. says

    You are so right Julie!
    When I’m offered something delicious, usually the answer I say is yes. But when it comes down to it, something that is better for my heart and body will exceed over something that doesn’t have that great of a nutritional value. 🙂

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  141. Jenna says

    Hey Julie! I think the reason why your blog is so successful is that it’s not predicated on the notion of denial, denial, denial. Certain blogs, good while they may be in their own ways, nauseate the average reader with their “healthiness.” I have been a healthy eater long before the days of the blogosphere, but that doesn’t mean I don’t indulge, and don’t think others should. What really is SUPER nauseating to me is bloggers who pretend they’re indulging but really their “indulgences” would probably not considered indulgences by many. Something I also usually can see right through is when a blogger claims they’re eating one thing versus another because they “weren’t too hungry” when in reality, if I don’t want to eat something because of health content (or lack thereof), I freakin’ just admit it!

    In any case, what makes your blog so great is that you don’t pretend you’re on a stringent eating plan nor do you pretend you’re eating whatever the hell you want!

    Props, Julie!

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  142. says

    I’m really glad you wrote this post. One of the reasons I love your blog is actually because you DO write about all the times you say “yes.” I think that, to the contrary, a lot of bloggers find apprehension in writing about their “yes”es, or their indulgences. I notice that I sometimes avoid writing about internal battles, for instance, because I don’t want to be controversial. Anyway, I like your healthy attitude, which works for you because your metabolism and your fitness-focused lifestyle allow you to. If we all tried to write about the same exact habits, we’d be boring.

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  143. says

    What a great topic! When I write about my healthy choices, I’m sure others are judging me! People take one look at me and think I’m starving myself because I’m thin(er). I like to eat clean, it’s something I enjoy. But yes, I also eat 3 or 4 slices or even half of my birthday cake! Whatever. There are times to indulge and there are times to eat clean! It’s all about balance.

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  144. says

    I have such a hard time saying no…I really do. Especially because I’m training for a half marathon so I think I can just eat whatever, but I can tell that isn’t the case my looking at my stomach. It’s frustrating because I’m starving from running so much, but I’m not loosing any weight. It helps to know that other people have to say no and I will use this as a reminder that I’m not alone.

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  145. says

    Having lost weight and needing to lose weight now I have struggle with admitting when I say yes because I feel people will judge and say “that’s why she’s heavy.”

    I appreciate seeing it from the opposite perspective of a thinner person saying they need to say no at times instead eating whatever.

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  146. says

    I guess I don’t really take my blog into account when saying yes or no to foods. I just base my decision on my current mood and (like you said) the other “indulgences” I’ve already made that day. Like you, it’s not something I blog about… or even think to blog about.

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  147. says

    Great post, Julie! There will be some blogs that I come across where the author will detail how she’s eating her weekly indulgence of one square of chocolate, and I think, “Oh my gosh, I could NEVER live like that.”

    I “indulge” in something every day, but my “indulgences” to me aren’t fried foods or ice cream; they’re things like trail mix, homemade granola, juicy watermelon, or raw desserts. But, I still love chocolate!

    It’s hard to write about saying no because people are always judging. I think among bloggers there’s the tendency to compare oneself to another person, when in fact we are all different and should listen to what’s best for us, not someone else.

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  148. Rachel says

    This is an awesome post Julie! I am an active blog reader, and try to follow a healthy lifestyle and I find that I’m judged often for it. I do eat dessert, very often, but when I order a salad for dinner and pass on dessert sometimes my own friends stare at me as if something’s wrong with me. There are some days where I do feel I have to say “no”, and cut back on the sugar. That’s why I have days where I CAN eat those less healthy foods. Some people don’t understand that, and it’s frustrating.

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  149. says

    I love this post and believe you represent what “healthy” looks like. It’s unrealistic for the average person to be straight up healthy, healthy ALL the time. Having indulgences makes you human!

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  150. says

    This is great – I totally understand. I feel like as soon as you choose watermelon over cake or whatever, people get “concerned.” Especially after recovering from my ED, I feel like I can’t make a healthy choice without being judged. I still want to be healthy! And that completely means saying no!

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  151. says

    Thank you for your honesty! I think saying no is definitely one of the hardest things about living a healthy lifestyle. I will admit I feel like I have streaks where the word “no” just escapes me. This past week, the one of my Masters graduation and my big move to the city, was definitely one of them. Getting back on track though does bring a sense of balance back. And let’s face it, no may have slipped my mind but I enjoyed every bite!

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  152. says

    I looove you, Julie! Your honesty is such a breath of fresh air here in the blogging community and I can tell that this post came straight from your heart. I actually feel that I really needed to hear this.

    I, like you, am lucky enough to be able to indulge when I want without gaining a ton of weight. However, I’ve noticed that I definitely can’t say YES all the time. I wouldn’t want to, though. Treats are special because they are just that–treats! If we ate treats all the time, they would lose their appeal.

    I appreciate hearing that you make conscious healthy decisions for yourself and don’t go willy nilly on the ice cream every single day. I like the persona you have on your blog and the way you represent healthy living.

    Thanks!

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  153. says

    As a new blogger who is just beginning her healthy journey, I find myself actually hesitating more to admit when I said, “Yes!” I feel like I need to present to my readers that I’ve made big changes in my life. I often find myself taking a step back, looking at a few days’ or a week’s worth of posts, and asking myself if I’m accurately representing my habits. If not, I too feel the need to be sure I change the representation so it’s accurate. When I travel, it seems like everything I post about is unhealthy. Then I get to a point of thinking I need a post like this one.

    It’s beautiful and honest! Thanks!

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